Best UFC Gambling Sites

The Ultimate Fighting Championship (UFC) is the big-league in the world of mixed martial arts. If you’re an aspiring fighter, a UFC title fight represents the best possible outcome in your career. If you’re just a casual fan like the rest of us, the UFC is what you watch to see who is truly the best no-holds barred fighter in the world.

The good thing is, you don’t have to be a trained fighter to get a spike of adrenalin when the doors to the octagon open. All you have to do is place a couple bets on the next big fight and you’ll be right there with the fighters. Seriously, the UFC is exciting on its own, but it’s a totally different experience when you have money on the line.

If you’re ready to bet, we have a few recommendations for you. Below are the best UFC gambling sites based on our own experiences with dozens of online bookmakers:

Finding A Place to Gamble

It’s hard telling how much UFC gambling money is booked around the world, but all the major bookies in Vegas and gambling sites on the web cover the UFC. In fact, there are just as many UFC gambling sites out there as there are brick-and-mortar betting shops.

You’ll never have a problem finding a place to bet on the UFC. There are plenty of options out there. What you may find difficult, however, is finding the right place to take your bankroll. It is of utmost importance that you find a safe, trustworthy gambling site.

We’ve also found that the variety of UFC-related wagers varies from site to site. Some places seem to put all MMA events on the backburner. They might offer a couple of token bets on big matchups, but that’s about it. Others, like the ones listed above, cover all the big fights plus the undercards and other random events.

There’s also variety in the types of bets offered on each bout. At some places, the most you get is the option to bet on who will win the fight. Other gambling sites take it further with wagers on how many rounds the fight will last and how the fight will end. If you know your fighters, there is good money to be made with all these types of wagers.

How UFC Betting Works

The majority of UFC bets are set up as straight moneylines. These are simple wagers on who you think will win the fight. There are no points to keep track of and it doesn’t matter how the winner wins. The only thing that matters in a moneyline is whose hand is raised at the end.

In all sports, there are bound to be favorites and underdogs – those who are seen as dominant and those who are seen as long shots. Moneylines account for that disparity by giving attractive odds to the underdog and less attractive odds to the favorite.

For example, a moneyline might look something like this:

  • Anderson Silva -205
  • Chael Sonnen +165

Anderson Silva is seen as the favorite in this fight, so his odds are -205. This means that you will be asked to risk $2.05 for every $1.00 in potential winnings. So if you wager $205 on Silva, you will be paid $100 in winnings if he does indeed win.

Chael Sonnen is the underdog in this fight, so his odds are +165. This means that for every $1.00 you risk on Sonnen, you will have $1.65 in potential winnings. So if you wager $100 on Sonnen and he wins the fight, you’ll get $165.

Gambling sites set the odds up like this to encourage action on both sides of the bet. If there were no odds, everyone would just bet on the favorite every time and the sportsbook would bleed money.

Sometimes you’ll run across wagers on how long the fight will last. These are set up kind of like point totals, except they go by the number of rounds. In this type of wager, the sportsbook will pick something like 3.5 rounds. You can then wager on either the over (that the fight will last longer than 3.5 rounds) or the under (that the fight will last for less than 3.5 rounds).

Prop bets in the UFC cover everything else not related to who actually wins the fight. For example, a common prop bet is on how the fight will end. This type of bet comes with 4 options: knockout by strikes, submission, decision or draw. Each outcome is given its own moneyline odds to account for the likelihood of that outcome.

Bookmakers set the odds of each outcome by looking at each fighter and coming to a conclusion about the likelihood of each outcome. So if two well-known strikers are scheduled to a 5-round bout, knockouts and decisions will pay less because those outcomes are seen as more likely than a submission or draw.